Information Literacy Copyright

InfoLiteracy During the month of October we have been doing posts relating to National Information Literacy Awareness Month and how you can increase your information literacy. This is our last Information Literacy post of this year. We hope you have enjoyed them. Leave a comment if you have a question or suggestion for a topic for next October. In today’s post, we’re taking a brief look at copyright.

Copyright is a complicated subject so this is just going to skim the surface, but I think the basic facts will be helpful. It’s such a complicated subject that most such summaries include a sentence like, this is NOT legal advice and I am NOT a lawyer, contact a lawyer for further information (so there’s mine). Copyright is, at its most basic, a right to copy. It was designed to encourage production of new ideas and writings by making sure people could make enough money off their work to keep them producing more. Copyright is also designed to expire (although laws keep pushing that date farther and farther away) so that the general population could build on and expand on those previously created works building new things and creations for the good of society. For example, Walt Disney Productions can take out of copyright fairytales like Snow White collected by the Brothers Grimm and make the movie Snow White or Seth Grahame-Smith can take the out of copyright novel Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen and make Pride and Prejudice with Zombies.

Anytime you make a copy of a work still under copyright protection, without permission or without falling within fair use guidelines, you have violated the laws governing copyright. Some things to keep in mind as a student:

  • Not everything you copy or manipulate for a class is considered fair use (otherwise known as OK to do) because you are a student.
  • That fact that it’s technically easy to use someone else’s work (to download, copy, manipulate, paste in a paper or a PowerPoint, etc.), doesn’t mean it’s legal to do so.
  • There are places where people post stuff that they want you to copy, so you can use them without asking permission, for example Creative Commons. You can find creative commons photos by searching Photo Pin.
  • Even when you are using something with permission, most people require a photo credit or a citation giving credit that you are using their work in your project.
  • You may think it’s OK to do something because you get away with breaking copyright law once, but if you are caught the consequences can be a cease-and-desist order, a fine, or even a lawsuit. The fact that you had done it many times before without getting in trouble won’t help your case.
  • When you sign up for some program or website (like Facebook or Pinterest) you are often asked to click agree on something called Terms and Conditions. When you click agree make sure you understand that you are agreeing to abide to stricter measures on copyright and giving up control of your work among other things. It’s a good idea to actually read them before clicking.
  • When you buy a program, etc. it often comes with the license, and license restrictions are often much, much stricter than copyright. By agreeing to the license you are agreeing to follow these stricter rules, but again make sure you know what they are before you agree to them.

Learn more about copyright for students with this handout from Iowa Area Education Agencies:
http://www.iowaaeaonline.org/vnews/display.v/ART/48d13d04446d2

See past Kirkwood related blog posts on:

Also find books on copyright in the collection around 346 and many more are available as e-books through the catalog.

Sarah Uthoff is a reference library at Kirkwood Community College. LIKE the Kirkwood Community College Library on Facebook and find links to Sarah all over the web at her About Me Profile.

 

 


Information Literacy Older Americans Online

During the rest of October we will be doing posts relating to National Information Literacy Awareness Month and how you can increase your information literacy. In today’s post were looking at how to be smart about passwords. InfoLiteracy

There is a saying that you can’t teach an old dog new tricks, but the saying proves false when it comes to older Americans and Internet use. While they still lag behind the numbers of the general population, the percent of older Americans who reported they went online once a week jumped up 6% from last year to a new record of 59%. Once seniors start going online they tend to be very active. Smart phones hold the least interest from them, but cell phones are widely used. Social media doesn’t hold a big appeal, but reading devices like tablets and e-readers hold more interest (probably because they are light to hold and they can easily adjust text size).

There are two main groups of seniors, one who is more affluent and better educated and one less affluent and educated. The more affluent the more likely they are to go online regularly and use things like social media. Older adults who don’t get involved online tend to have three reasons; physical challenges to using technology, skeptical attitudes about the benefits of technology, and difficulties learning to use new technologies.

Read more about it in this report from the Pew Foundation:

http://www.pewinternet.org/2014/04/03/older-adults-and-technology-use/

Sarah Uthoff is a reference library at Kirkwood Community College. LIKE the Kirkwood Community College Library on Facebook and find links to Sarah all over the web at her About Me Profile.

 


Information Literacy Passwords

InfoLiteracyDuring the rest of October we will be doing posts relating to National Information Literacy Awareness Month and how you can increase your information literacy. In today’s post were looking at how to be smart about passwords.

So many people do it. You come up with one password and use it over and over again across the web. It’s easy to remember and what’s the big deal? Hackers know people do this and if they steal information from one website, which lists e-mails and passwords they may try them again on another site they like to access. Instead of always going with an easy to remember password, it’s a good idea to just plan on writing down your passwords and keep them handy that way so you don’t have to worry about not remembering them. Or if you can’t write them down, try to make them easy for you to remember & hard for anyone to hack (see stronger passwords article below). While it may not be that big a deal if a site where you use a discussion board of something gets hacked and no important personal information is stolen, if you use the same passwords for different important websites you’ve just handed hackers the keys for accessing your other accounts. So watch what password you use where.

Also, you might just want to up your game on the passwords you do use. Each year SplashData collects already compromised data to look for the most commonly used passwords. If you use any of the passwords on this list (each complete with a hilarious snarky comment), change it now in honor of National Information Literacy Awareness Month.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2014/01/22/_25_worst_passwords_what_your_terrible_common_password_says_about_you.html

Want to change to a stronger password? Check out his suggestion.
http://www.slate.com/blogs/business_insider/2013/12/08/how_to_create_a_secure_password_that_s_easy_to_remember.html

And learn more about passwords:
http://www.cnet.com/how-to/the-guide-to-password-security-and-why-you-should-care/

Sarah Uthoff is a reference library at Kirkwood Community College. LIKE the Kirkwood Community College Library on Facebook and find links to Sarah all over the web at her About Me Profile.


Information Literacy Social Media

informationlit It’s Information Literacy Month and Pew Research Center has taken a look at Social Media.

The Pew Research Center is a bipartisan research center that conducts studies to provide useful knowledge to the public. A recent study looked at how people engage in news through social media. They examined most of the big social media sites. Most people don’t turn to them for news. The biggest number who do are on Facebook, mostly because they have the highest number of users, but the news looked at is mostly having to do with entertainment. Twitter users were the most engaged. However, news, especially engaged at all with politics or political correctness, has very little actual discussion online (even on Twitter which is all about discussion) because people are unlikely to engage with those with differing opionions and are reluctant to post something that contradicts the views of their friends. In other words, if you only see one point of view in your various timelines, it doesn’t really mean that’s what everybody thinks or that it’s the one correct way to view it.

Read more here:
http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/09/24/how-social-media-is-reshaping-news

And be sure to find Kirkwood Libraries at Facebook and YouTube.

Sarah Uthoff is a reference library at Kirkwood Community College. LIKE the Kirkwood Community College Library on Facebook and find links to Sarah all over the web at her About Me Profile.


October is National Information Literacy Awareness Month

Information Literacy Supporter Badge
Each October our thoughts turn to National Information Literacy Awareness Month. Information Literacy, making sure people can find, evaluate for quality and use the information that they need, is a big part of any library Program. It’s no longer enough to be literate, as in being able to read, but you must be literate in figuring out where you can get the information you need and separating the wheat from the chaff to make sure what you’ve found is good.

Read a brief history and what is going on nationally here:
http://infolit.org/national-information-literacy-awareness-month-is-october/

You can also find the badge, like the one above, please share it on your various social media sites to help make people aware of the importance of good information:
http://www.librariesthriving.org/partnerships/2014-information-literacy-campaign
(Make sure you select your state before copying, it shows up on the badge.)

Find last year’s posts and Iowa’s proclamation on National Information Literacy Awareness Month here:
https://kirkwoodlibrary.wordpress.com/2013/10/04/information-literacy-awareness-month-comes-to-iowa/

Watch for a series of blog posts that will come out this month giving you a leg up with information literacy.

Sarah Uthoff is a reference library at Kirkwood Community College. LIKE the Kirkwood Community College Library on Facebook and find links to Sarah all over the web at her About Me Profile.

 


New Database Trials – October 2014

October is Information Literacy Month! To celebrate, your Kirkwood Community College library is doing a trial of 4 databases from October 1st through October 31st. Two of the databases, JSTOR and Project Muse, will add to our online journal collection in the areas of English, Social Science, general Humanities, and general Science. The other two, Alexander Street Press and Films on Demand, contain videos and films, which would be a new service for our library. To read more about these databases and the segments we are trialing; please check out our library guide.

Unfortunately, adding databases to our collection can be quite expensive, so the library wants to make sure that we use our funds wisely. Therefore, the addition of these is completely dependent on you, our customer. So after you check these out, please complete the survey to let us know what you think. Your responses will tell us whether to purchase a database and more specifically which components to purchase.

project muse    films on demand2   Alexander street press       jstor

So Happy Information Literacy Month and Happy Searching!


Most Banned Books of 2013

Kirkwood Banned Book Display

Kirkwood Banned Book Display

Many bookstores, schools and libraries celebrating Banned Books Week will showcase selections from the ALA OIF’s Top Ten Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2013. The list is released each spring and provides a snapshot of book removal attempts in the U.S. The Top Ten Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2013 reflects a range of themes. Below each title is the reason or reasons it was challenged. The top 10 list consists of the following titles:

  1. “Captain Underpants” (series), by Dav Pilkey.
    Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited for age group, violence
  2. “The Bluest Eye,” by Toni Morrison
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, violence
  3. “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian,” by Sherman Alexie.|
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, racism, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group
  4. “Fifty Shades of Grey,” by E. L. James.
    Reasons: Nudity, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  5. “The Hunger Games,” by Suzanne Collins
    Reasons: Religious viewpoint, unsuited to age group
  6. “A Bad Boy Can Be Good for A Girl,” by Tanya Lee Stone
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit
  7. “Looking for Alaska,” by John Green.
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  8. “The Perks of Being a Wallflower,” by Stephen Chbosky
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, homosexuality, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  9. “Bless Me Ultima,” by Rudolfo Anaya
    Reasons: Occult/Satanism, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit
  10. “Bone” (series), by Jeff Smith
    Reasons: Political viewpoint, racism, violence

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